Reservations

 

Abajo Haven Video

 

Comfarables cabins in the nature, animal meetings, an historic Indian archaelogical site, a fire camp under the moonlight, and a very very warm welcome. One of the great moments of our vacation in the USA near some beautiful National parks. If you visit the area, spend some nights at Bill and Leslie's guest cabins. You won't regret it!

--Bruno LE NAY and family, France

Ancient Ruins and Geology of the Southwest

Visit the many sites that San Juan County has to offer. But, please remember to respect these ancient and sacred sites as you visit them.

wolfman panel



Comb Ridge

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Comb ridge is an eroded monocline, or bending of the earth's crust in only one direction. It begins near elk ridge to the north and extends approvimately eighty miles to Kayenta, Arizona. Comb wash is an extremely important geological feature and has been inhabited by people before the time of Christ. Comb ridge has many hiking trails to ancestral puebloan sites. Contact us for more information.

Valley of the Gods

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Home to great sandstone monoliths, delicate spires and long rock fins rising from the valley floor, the rugged and remote landscape of Valley of the Gods rivals even nearby Monument Valley. This seventeen mile loop drive is a photographer's playground. Contact us for more information.

Hovenweep National Monument

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Photo by Val Dyhouse

Pioneering photographer William Henry Jackson in 1874 first used the name "Hovenweep," which is Ute/Paiute for "deserted valley." Today tall towers, outlines of multi-room pueblos, tumbled piles of shaped stone, small cliff dwellings, pottery shards, and rock art lie scattered across the canyon landscape. There is no doubt that a sizable population once lived in this ruggedly beautiful, high desert setting. Despite seven centuries of weathering, many large structures and tall tower walls still stand as tributes to their builders. Visitors can walk along quiet, primitive trails and imagine what these communities must have been like long ago. www.nps.gov/hove

Cedar Mesa / Grand Gulch

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Moonhouse Ruin

Spend days and days exploring the rich archeological area of Cedar Mesa and Grand Gulch. Rock panel artwork left by the ancients abounds in this wilderness setting. Most sites can only be reached by hiking or backpacking. Visit http://www.blm.gov/ut/st/en/fo/monticello/
recreation/grand_gulch_and_cedar.html
or contact the ranger station for more information on hiking trails.

Natural Bridges National Monument

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Natural Bridges

Natural Bridges has been named the first International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association because of its splendid starry skies. In 1904 National Geographic Magazine publicized the bridges, and in 1908 Theodore Roosevelt established Natural Bridges National Monument, creating Utah's first National Park System area. Natural Bridges consists of a series of spectacular naturally formed bridges. You can contact the Natural Bridges Visitor Center at (435) 692-1234, or visit www.nps.gov/nabr.

Monument Valley

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Monument Valley, photo by Les Smith

Monument Valley is located on the Navajo Reservation and is one of the most famous sites in the world. Known in Navajo as Tse' Bii' Ndzisgaii, this Navajo Tribal Park has served as the backdrop for countless motion pictures, including Forrest Gump, Stagecoach (starring John Wayne), and Back to the Future III. National Geographic listed Monument Valley in its top 50 places to visit. www.nav.htm

Goosenecks State Park

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Goosenecks State Park is one of the most striking and impressive examples of an entrenched river meander on the North American continent. The San Juan River twists and turns 1000 feet below you. Also listed in National Geographic's top 50 places to visit! http://www.utah.com/stateparks/goosenecks.htm

Abajo Mountains/Dark Canyon

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Val Dyhouse photo

The Abajo Mountains are what gives life to this region! You can drive the Abajo loop from your cabin to the town of Monticello. This road will take you through spectacular scenery. You can drive or hike to elevations over 11,000 feet, where you can view the Colorado Plateau in all directions. See Canyonlands to the north and the San Juan Mountains of Colorado to the east. This road will also connect you to the Dark Canyon Wilderness area, named the first wilderness area on the Colorado Plateau. The drive is a must-see when you are visiting San Juan County! http://www.go-utah.com/utah/dark-canyon/wilderness.html

Butler Wash

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Butler Wash is one of the richest archeology areas in North America. There are rock art panels and Ancestral Puebloan sites from the north end, where it meets Comb Ridge, all the way south to the San Juan River. Some sites are easily accessible directly off Highway 95. If you are an avid hiker, additional sites can be found deep within Butler Wash. Contact us for more information.

Muley Point

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Muley Point, photo by Les Smith

Listed on National Geographic's top 50 places to visit, Muley Point has often been compared to the Grand Canyon. You will find a spectacular view of the majestic San Juan River and Monument Valley! Contact us for more information.